Spring has sprung here in the Hudson Valley and thankfully, the wildlife has come alive. We may have come across them or heard them late at night.

With the start of Spring, I have heard Spring peepers, owls, and more friendly noises.

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Personally, I have witnessed two skunks possibly playing with one another and also making funny noises. I came across a beautiful turtle on the road which I helped cross. In addition to this wildlife, you may have come across deer and their babies.

Click here to see which animal sounds you have heard with the start of spring.

It's human nature to slow down or even stop when an animal is on the road. This is the least that we can do for our furry friends who are just trying to get by.

I get so excited when I see a deer family, alive and well. However, there have been times that I noticed that a fawn is by itself. It's been hard for me not to try to take care of it or pet it (ha-ha).

What should you do if you find a fawn by itself?

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Simply, leave it alone. Fawns are able to walk after they are born but they do spend their time laying in the grass when firstborn. The female adult deer (the mother) will leave the fawn for some time during the day. This is a smart move so that predators stay away from the newborn. The mother does return for nursing. 

Is it okay to touch a fawn?

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It is never recommended to touch fawns or any other wildlife.

The Department of Environmental Conservation recommends this one thing.

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"If you care, leave it there."

This note is a friendly reminder to the community to respect wildlife. I know that it can be challenging to not try to adopt every animal that you see. This is something that I would love to do (ha-ha).

Also, a reminder that keeping wildlife in captivity is considered illegal in New York State. It is also harmful to the animal as well.

How can we protect not only fawns, and deer but also, other wildlife?

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In order for us to protect and care for wildlife, the best thing that we can do is respect their environment and their natural, survival needs on their own.

It is never recommended for a fawn to be picked up as it could affect its survival and nursing from its mother.

Here's what to do if you come across wildlife in need of assistance.

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However, if you come across a wildlife animal that is acting sick, hurt or unwell, you can contact the DEC regional wildlife office.

Click here to view the page.

Have you ever witnessed a fawn relaxing in nature? Maybe, you saw a deer family that was frolicking in the Hudson Valley. Share your experience with us.

Hudson Valley Wildlife Gallery

The Hudson Valley is full of wildlife. Here are just a few of our furry, slithery, and feather friends that might frequent your backyard. Please reach out and let us know which creature we may have left off the list.

Meet the Hiking Therapy Animals of the Hudson Valley

Eleanor Pigby made a splash on social media around the Hudson Valley this week. Turns out she's part of a pretty special team. Get to know Eleanor and the rest of the Pets For Purpose Animal Therapy group of The Summit School in Nyack.