I know this sounds crazy, but when you start looking at it, you might think that 'big brother' is watching you even more than they already are.

How is your Social Security Number a code? How to decode it?

Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash
Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash
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Your Social Security Number is a 9-digit number, right? But it is always broken down into three separate sections.

What do the three sections of numbers in your Social Security Number represent?

Photo by Green Chameleon on Unsplash
Photo by Green Chameleon on Unsplash
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The number is broken down into a three-digit, a two-digit, and a four-digit number. This combination exists only for one person, you!

Depending on your birthday, the first section of numbers means this in your Social Security Number.

Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash
Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash
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The first three-digit part of your Social Security Number (if you were born in 1972 or earlier) is actually a geographic identifier. Most people who had their Social Security Numbers issued in New York or Connecticut, for instance, their SSN will start with the number 0. For someone born on the West Coast, it starts with a 5. This first part is called the area number.

What does the second set of numbers in your Social Security Number represent? The two-digit number?

Photo by Scott Graham on Unsplash
Photo by Scott Graham on Unsplash
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The second part (the two-digit number), is the group number. These are not issued consecutively and have to do with the area of that particular state where your number was issued.

The last part, the 4-digit part, is you. While there is a chance that someone else will also share the same last 4-digits of the Social Security Number, each number is only used one time and exclusively for you.

13 of the Most Dazzling and Historic Carousels in New York State

Who doesn't like a ride on an old-fashion carousel or merry-go-round? All ages, from the youngest to the most senior love going round and around while sitting on top of a gaily painted hand-carved horse or other animal. They are nostalgic for the older folks, and an exciting new adventure for the little ones. New York State can be considered the "Birthplace of the Carousels" because of the Herschell Carrousel Museum and Factory in North Tonawanda, N.Y., where they made hundreds of them over a century.

We are so lucky to have 46 historic, working carousels in the Empire State. Here is a list of 13 of the best!

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