There may not be a more fascinating animal in the northeast than the moose. Simultaneously majestic, scary, and goofy; these massive mammals are a rare sight to behold in the Hudson Valley. Maybe that's why such an intense debate was sparked after one was spotted in East Fishkill.

This juvenile moose was spotted in East Fishkill (News 12 via YouTube)
This juvenile moose was spotted in East Fishkill (News 12 via YouTube)
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Moose Debate in East Fishkill, NY

At the center of the argument was what exactly to do about the moose. "Poor thing is scared and hungry and needs help, I wish I could help other than a phone call", said one worried resident on Facebook. Not everyone agreed. "He's not hungry and moose eat grass and water plants... Leave him alone he doesn't need anyone to help him", came the response from a neighbor. So what should you really do if you see a moose in the Hudson Valley?

News 12 via YouTube
News 12 via YouTube
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What to Do if You See a Moose in New York

Whether you're in New York, Canada, or anywhere in between, you should never approach a moose. They are enormous animals with the ability to charge if they feel threatened. If they do charge, runaway and try your hardest to get out of their way. There's still a way to help, though.

The young moose in the Hudson Valley was spotted at John Jay high school (News 12 via YouTube)
The young moose in the Hudson Valley was spotted at John Jay high school (News 12 via YouTube)
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Moose Intervention in the Hudson Valley

If you see a moose, report it to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) here. They are actively tracking moose mobility in New York state. The DEC recognizes that it is common for moose to come as far south as Columbia County, NY, But Dutchess County sightings are very rare. So why isn't anything "being done" about the East Fishkill moose?

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The moose in East Fishkill is wandering freely because human intervention is a dangerous process for everyone, animal included. For this reason, tranquilization and/or relocation "is only attempted when no alternative exists." As one commenter said, "Authorities who need to know [about the moose], know. They are not intervening because HE IS OK."

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