New York state has its share of invasive species, many of which can wreak havoc on local ecosystems. But are some quite as bad as they say? Some outside species can actually benefit the land.

See Also: See Also: The 4 Most Dangerous Ticks in New York State

One of the latest invasive species in New York has actually been mistaken for mosquitos, though they're a bit larger.

Crane Flies

The European Crane Fly (or, leather jackets, or, Mosquito Hawks) is native to northwestern Europe and has been found across parts of Canada and the United States, including New York.

New York Invasive Species Information says that there are two separate species, the Tipula paludosa and Tipula oleracea have been found in New York. Adults begin to emerge in late summer, though T. oleracea goes through two generations a year, with a second birth in the late spring.

NYIS says that crane flies thrive in "moist soils and prefer mild winters and cool summers".

Animal Fun Facts/YouTube
Animal Fun Facts/YouTube
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Crane Flies have been known to have a negative impact on the turfgrass industry (particularly golf courses and sod farms), for the pests "lay their eggs in the soil for larvae to feed."

Some, including experts from Ohio State University, have said that these bigger versions of mosquitos actually "serve a valuable function as the 'clean-up crew' converting large pieces of organic matter into smaller particles on the way to enriching the soil."

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Basically, they can be good and bad.

Crane flies do not bite humans. NYIS says that Tipula Paludosa was first found in the state in 2004, in Erie, Monroe and Niagara counties.

See Also: Bug Spotted in Hudson Valley Looks and Sounds Nasty, But is Beneficial

Another species, Tipula oleracea, is found in Monroe, Niagara, Ontario, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, Wayne, Nassau and Suffolk counties in New York, according to Invasive Species. 

Other Invasive Creatures - Asian Jumping Worms

Hammerheads are not to be confused with "Asian jumping worms", another invasive species of worm.

Shifting climates and increased global travel have made it easier for species not native to areas to spread in a fairly short amount of time across the globe, causing varying degrees of environmental destruction.

Getty/Asian Jumping worms
Getty/Asian Jumping worms
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Other Nasty Creatures Have Also Been Spotted

There's also the Southern Pine Beetle, the Spotted Lanternfly, and the aforementioned Joro Spider (which is scary-looking, but relatively harmless).

Southern Pin Beetles:

DEC
DEC
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Spotted Lanternfly:

DEC/Lanternfly
DEC/Lanternfly
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Joro Spider:

Getty Images/Joro spider
Getty Images/Joro spider
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5 of New York's Most Devastating Invasive Species

Here are 5 species that have invaded New York State and in some cases they must be killed. We are talking about fish that walk on land, plants that cause severe burns and insects that could wipe out a variety of crops that we rely on.

Keep an eye out for these species and you hike, work around the yard or do some fishing this year. Should you locate any of these it is important to report where and when you found them to the New York State DEC.

Gallery Credit: Karolyi