Spring has sprung here in the Hudson Valley and a lot of our favorite wildlife, insects, and furry friends are coming around. Recently, I have heard the spring peepers (frogs), owls, and skunks playing and more wildlife during the night.

Click here to see if you also hear similar sounds when trying to fall asleep,

Hudson Valley critters are waking up the more that we get into Spring.

It's refreshing to hear birds chirping on a warm, spring morning. It's a beautiful reminder that it's going to be a good day.

First, we heard about the invasive worm species that is on the rise in the Hudson Valley. 

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Getty Images
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It's also important to know about safety tips for fawn season.

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Canva
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Click here to read about how we can protect fawns and what to do if we find one alone.

Along with the return of our wildlife friends, we are also getting quite the visit from Hudson Valley insects already. Now, we're learning about a new fungus baring beetle in New York State.

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Youtube, Canva
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You may have spotted this beetle already, most importantly, you want to keep an eye out for the tree that it's in or affecting.

Have you heard of the Ambrosia beetle?

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Canva
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Known for being quite a pest, the Ambrosia beetle may look like any other beetle that you have come across before. In a sense, it attacks the actual wood of a tree that has been spotted before in apple trees.

This beetle may be tiny but is capable of destroying trees all throughout New York. The Ambrosia beetle has, in fact, destroyed numerous trees in Central New York.

They can appear to be brown or red and oftentimes, black.

What should you do if you see an Ambrosia beetle in New York State?

You can do your part by informing the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) if you happen to come across any affected trees. This way, they can keep track of the beetle's location and the trees in the area that were damaged.

Click here to submit a form to do so, if needed.

Take a look at what Ambrosia beetles do to Hudson Valley trees.

It may appear to look like strings on a tree but once you look closer, you notice that it isn't what you thought it was.

They are known for being one of the most destructive bugs. Hopefully, you don't come across one this spring in the Hudson Valley.

Have you ever spotted one of these bugs before? Is there one insect that you don't like? Share with us below.

Hudson Valley Wildlife Gallery

The Hudson Valley is full of wildlife. Here are just a few of our furry, slithery, and feather friends that might frequent your backyard. Please reach out and let us know which creature we may have left off the list.

Hudson Valley Eagles or Lovebirds? Amazing Photos Tell the Story

Beautiful Pictures of Hudson Valley Eagles in Love