They may not be as cute as turtles but they still need help crossing the road.

Most people's first instinct when they see a large rattlesnake is to run in the complete opposite direction but these threatened species need saving. That natural instinct has kept our species alive. Thankfully, humans have come a long way and now we have a responsibility to help the smaller creatures out there.

If you were walking in the woods and heard a rattle only to find the sound coming from a snake it would be wise to keep a safe distance but what if you saw one trying to cross the road?

Would you stop you car to help make sure it crosses safely? One fearless man here in the Hudson Valley did that and even took it one step further.

The man's name is Richard Hudgens and no he doesn't work in pest control. He's just a local reptile enthusiast. The snake was identified as a Timber Rattlesnake which are indigenous to this region according to the DEC. Richard found this one near Minnewaska State Park.

Rich Hudgens

He loves studying them, capturing them on camera and sharing how magnificent they are on social media. Timber Rattlesnakes are not endangered but they are threatened. There has been a lot more snake sightings in the Hudson Valley this year.

I've never handled a snake before especially one that's venomous but he makes it look so effortless. If this were an Olympic sport I think it's safe to say he could bring home the gold.

Check out his Instagram page for more amazing videos.

I want to know how he was able to put the camera so close to it.

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