This long vacant building on Ulster Ave in Kingston was the place to be on Friday nights for decades.

The Alice in Videoland building has remained untouched since its closure in 2007. Despite its shuttered state, its iconic sign sat at least until 2018, if not longer, marking the spot where countless memories were made.

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Established in 1982, Alice in Videoland was a local favorite for 25 years, boasting a substantial inventory of movies that grew from 600 titles to approximately 25,000 at its peak. The store's layout was carefully organized, with new releases showcased on the back wall, and sections dedicated to pro wrestling, MMA, video games, and DVDs strategically placed for easy access upon entry.

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Entering Alice in Videoland was an experience in itself. The aroma of freshly popped popcorn greeted visitors, mingling with the dim lighting to create a cozy yet slightly eerie ambiance. The store's extensive horror movie selection, offering five movies for five days at $5, was particularly popular, attracting thrill-seekers and movie enthusiasts alike.

Adding to its "charm:" was the presence of an adult room, concealed behind saloon doors, sparking curiosity among young patrons. With multiple locations, including outlets in Phoenicia and Saugerties, Alice in Videoland was a bustling hub of entertainment, a fine place for a precocious teenager to work and a go-to destination for movie lovers.

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Despite its popularity, Alice in Videoland couldn't withstand the onslaught of technological advancements. The rise of the internet and the advent of streaming services like Netflix posed significant challenges, ultimately leading to its demise. Today, the once vibrant Alice in Videoland sits vacant, a silent testament to an era long gone, yet fondly remembered by those who walked through its doors.

 

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