The New York State Department of Health is warning that people who ate at a local diner may have been exposed to an especially contagious disease.

Two new cases of the measles have been reported after two European travelers potentially exposed thousands of local residents to the disease. These new cases now put even more people at risk of contracting measles, especially those who have not been vaccinated.

The NYS Department of Health says that two Putnam County residents have now been diagnosed with the measles. Because these new patients traveled to several places throughout our area while contagious, health officials urge the public to look for symptoms, especially if you've traveled to any of the same locations as the two patients. One of the spots is a popular diner right here in the Hudson Valley.

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If you visited the Red Line Diner at 588 Route 9, Fishkill, NY between 10:30PM on April 27, 2018 and 1:30AM on April 28, 2018, you may have been exposed to measles. This is just one of the locations that has been listed by the New York State Department of Health.

Other spots include:

  • Watchtower Educational Center in Patterson on April 26 and 27
  • Museum at the Watchtower World Headquarters on April 27
  • Subway Restaurant on Route 22 in Patterson, NY between 3pm and 6pm on April 29
  • DeCicco and Sons (food market) in Brewster between 5pm and 8pm on May 1.

The New York State Department of Health explains who is at most risk:

Individuals are considered protected or immune to measles if they were born before 1957, have received two doses of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, have had measles disease, or have a lab test confirming immunity. Individuals who are not immune to measles and were exposed are at risk for developing measles. All individuals who were exposed to measles, particularly those without immunity or who are not sure if they have been vaccinated, should contact their health care provider if they develop measles symptoms. Symptoms include a fever, rash, cough, conjunctivitis or runny nose. Symptoms usually appear 10-12 days after exposure but may appear as early as 7 days and as late as 21 days after exposure.

More details on the disease and a full itinerary of the infected individuals can be found on the New York State Department of Health's website.