The government wants the Hudson Valley to be on the look out for these seven dangerous insects that may be looking to move into your warm home this winter.

According to the USDA, there are several invasive species of insects that have been spotted in our area, or may be on their way to the Hudson Valley. They can damage crops, threaten the ecosystem and even harm humans. These insects can survive year-round and may be lurking in that firewood, just waiting to get transported into your home this winter.

USDA

The Asian Longhorned Beetle
These guys have the potential to cause more harm to trees than Dutch Elm Disease, Chestnut Blight and Gypsy Moths combined. The beetles have been found in New York and threaten our local hardwood trees.

USDA

Khapra Beetle
The Hudson Valley is a suitable habitat for this beetle that lives in grain products and seeds. These beetles can survive for long periods of time in small cracks and crevices. While they're waiting to find your pantry they can survive for long periods of time without food, which makes them even more difficult to eradicate.

USDA

Spotted Lanternfly
Just recently discovered in New York, this insect is a threat to the country's grape, orchard and logging industries. They look similar to stinkbugs when their wings aren't open. The Spotted Lanternfly can be spread by moving firewood and other yard debris containing the insect's eggs.

USDA

European Gypsy Moth
First brought to our country from Europe in the late 60s, the Gypsy Moth has been a threat for decades. It's still dangerous to more than 300 species of trees and is currently under federal quarantine.

USDA

Emerald Ash Borer Beetle
Responsible for the destruction of tens of millions of ash trees, these beetles are good at hiding indoors. They originally came from Asia, hidden in wood packaging materials and are now found throughout the Hudson Valley.

USDA

Asian Gypsy Moth
The USDA is on the lookout for this incredibly hungry member of the Gypsy Moth family. These insects are very similar to the European Gypsy Moth, which has invaded the Hudson Valley.

USDA

Light Brown Apple Moth
These moths can be found in backyard gardens and on produce. They can be found on roses, chrysanthemums and poplar trees as well as other ornamental plants. According to the USDA, they may be able to survive a Hudson Valley winter, although right now they are primarily found in California and Hawaii.

To find out more about these and other insects that threaten the Hudson Valley you can visit the USDA's New York Invasive Species page.